By continuing your visit to this site, you accept the use of cookies. They ensure the proper functioning of our services and display relevant ads. Learn more about cookies and act

Not yet registered? Create a OverBlog!

Create my blog

A guide to buying Fiestaware plates

Fiestaware was created by a Stoke-on-Trent potter named Frederick Hurton Rhead and was introduced at the 1935 Pottery and Glass show in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania by the Homer Laughlin China Company (HLC). The dining ware was an instant hit. It even attracted the attention of Frank Lloyd Wright, who used it in the 1950s Zimmerman House (Manchester, New Hampshire). While the company stopped issuing the original line Fiestaware line in 1972, they reintroduced a new line in 1982.

1930s

The vintage Fiestaware, distinguished by narrowing, concentric circles, had 34 pieces. They came in red, cobalt blue, ivory, green and yellow. They included a coffeepot, a large teapot, an ice pitcher, a demitasse pot, a bud vase, a carafe, a stick-handled creamer, bulb and tripod candle holders, 13 and 15 inch chop plates, salt and pepper shakers, a sweet compote, 10 and 12 inch divided plates, 6, 7, 9 and 10 inch dinner plates, demitasse cups and saucers, a teacup and saucer, a 6-inch dessert plate, an ashtray, a-5 inch fruit bowl, a footed salad bowl, covered casserole, a set of seven mixing bowls, a cream soup bowl, a relish tray, a covered onion soup bowl, a-12 inch comport, and 8 1/2 and 9 1/2 inch nappies. Pieces added Egg cups, sauce boat, deep plates, covered casseroles, Tom and Jerry mugs, marmalade, mustard, two pint jugs, utility trays, 12 inch oval platters, 11 inch fruit bowls, 8, 10 and 12 inch vases, bowl lids, a ring-handled creamer and a 60-ounce disc water pitcher were added. The colour turquoise was added in 1937. Discontinued pieces In 1937, the 12 inch divided plate, stick-handled blender and covered onion soup dish were discontinued.

1940s to 1950s

A juice set, including a yellow 30 ounce disc jug, and tumblers in yellow, green, turquoise, red, blue and ivory was introduced. Discontinued pieces The tripod candle holders, 10 and 12 inch vases, stick-handled demitasse coffeepot,the colours red, cobalt and ivory, the footed salad bowl, the 11 1/2 inch fruit bowl, the bulb candle holders, the bud vase, carafe, 12 inch and sweet compote, mustard and marmalade, ice pitcher, relish tray, 9 1/2 inch nappy, large teapot, utility tray, 10 ounce tumbler, and the 8 inch vase, were discontinued.

1950s

The juice set was reintroduced, with a grey pitcher and dark green, yellow, chartreuse and sometimes rose tumblers. Colours added Dark green, red and medium green were introduced.

1960s

Ironstone was added in 1969. The original line was restyled. Pieces dropped The 6 inch dessert bowl ended.

1970s

Ironstone included gold, mango red and turf green. In 1973, the company reintroduced the original line and added new pieces.

Same category articles Tableware

A guide to buying decorative bowls

A guide to buying decorative bowls

A decorative bowl is a simple yet functional way of decorating your house. Whatever your personal style, your decorative plates and bowls will reflect just this. There is a variety of options to choose from. This article will help you make the proper selection from different options.
How to choose glass bowls

How to choose glass bowls

Glass bowls can be used for a myriad of different purposes. Glass bowls can be functional and used for things like serving food. They can be decorative and used as a centre piece on your table or for holiday decor. They can also be used in other rooms, besides the kitchen and dining room in order to create a pretty accent piece on book shelves or in the centre of a coffee table. When selecting glassware, vases bowls or other decorative pieces, you need to consider a number of different things.
Paperchase: The facts

Paperchase: The facts

You cannot deny it, Paperchase is one of the coolest places to go for birthday cards, cute pens and pencils and pretty knick-knacks for the home. This article takes a closer look at Paperchase stationary stores.
Where to buy plastic baskets

Where to buy plastic baskets

Plastic baskets, trays and bins have endless applications in the home and office. From garden baskets and plastic pots to washing baskets and bathroom toiletry containers, plastic storage solutions are visible just about everywhere. However, the widest use is likely to be in the kitchen, where one needs it for everything from simple bread trays to storage bins. Large baskets can be stacked to save space, and they're lightweight and cheap too.