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A guide to buying antique golf clubs

When it comes to buying antique golf clubs, there is a number of things that one should look out for. It is not just the age or the make of a club that you should be looking out for. This article will help you out.

Get the information

Information on purchases The most important thing that any buyer of vintage golf clubs should consider is how much information they are receiving on potential purchases. Get as much information as possible to insure what you are purchasing is exactly what you are after. You should be looking for: -club maker (if known) -where the club was made (if known) -overall length -type and condition of shaft (metal, wood and others. Is the shaft unusual, bowed, chipped or damaged?) -type and condition of the grip (sheepskin, leather and other material. Is the grip original, tight fitting/loose or maybe a replacement?) -type of clubhead and condition (iron or wood head/Is the head rusted, pitted, tight fit to the shaft/are there bag marks or dings to head/any known repairs?) All of these factors affect the value of each club and therefore, how much you should be paying for each one.

The seller

When buying antique golf clubs, or any golf memorabilia, it is always handy to buy from a seller who knows what they are talking about, and who is ideally, an expert in the trade. This will insure that any questions you have about the clubs get answered honestly and quickly and makes sure that you get exactly what you are buying for. Buy from a reliable source, not from a dodgy car boot sale or market.

Viewing the clubs

If you are viewing the clubs that you are purchasing in person, make sure that you have a list of things, which are unique about the clubs that you are after. This will enable you to match the clubs you are viewing with the research, that you have done previously.
Photographs of clubs If you are viewing clubs online, make sure that the seller has put crystal clear photographs of all of the important aspects of the clubs, listed above, up on whichever site they are selling from. This allows you to examine the clubs as closely as possible without actually having to view them in person and thus, you get exactly what you are after.

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