By continuing your visit to this site, you accept the use of cookies. They ensure the proper functioning of our services and display relevant ads. Learn more about cookies and act

Not yet registered? Create a OverBlog!

Create my blog

A guide to safety stair nosing

A stair nosing is a "projecting edge, as the part of the tread of a step extending beyond the riser or a projecting part of a buttress." As defined by the Construction Dictionary, a safety stair nosing is, "[a]n abrasive, nonslip stair nosing whose surface is flush with the tread against which it is placed." This article provides you with details about safety stair nosing.

OSHA regulations

Safety stair nosings are regulated by OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and the International Building Code. Safety stair nosings are available at building supply stores or online. Characteristics of safety stair nosings According to OSHA, safety stair nosings must consist of a surface that is non-slip. These nosings are often constructed of aluminum that have a non-slip surface made from granules epoxied to the top. If the stairs are made from concrete, the nosing can end thee inches from either side of the tread. If the stairs are made from steel pans that are filled with concrete, then the stair nosings must extend from side to side. If the stair treads consist of welded bars, then it is acceptable to have stairways without safety stair nosings. However, the edges of the stairs must be clearly marked in some manner, such as reflective or highly colourful tape, to make their presence easily seen. The other qualification with stairways consisting of welded bars is that they must have a serrated or non-slip surface.

International Building Code

According to the International Building Code, the safety stair nosings cannot extend beyond the stair tread more than 1.25 inches. Each of the stair nosings must be the same, ie consisting of the same curvature, including the very top stair of the stairwell. The curvature of the stair tread's leading edge cannot be more than 1/2 inch and the bevelling of the stair nosings cannot be more than 1/2 inch as well. The underside of the nosing's angle must be at least 30 degrees from the vertical. The risers must be solid, or sloped at tan angle not more than 30 degrees from vertical. If the risers are not solid, they must be spaced in such a way to prevent the passage of an object more than four inches between them.

Same category articles Do-it-yourself & Construction

Choosing a dust collection unit for a workshop

Choosing a dust collection unit for a workshop

Woodworking and machine shop dust is a serious health and safety risk. In this article, we'll look at exactly what hazards this problem causes and how to select dust collection systems that will match you or your company's needs. Read on to find out about the different types of dust extraction system and how to estimate the required air flow for your particular situation.
A guide to toolbox talks

A guide to toolbox talks

Toolbox talks are a series of safety lectures that were created and selected by BLR. BLR was founded by Robert L Brady in 1977. The mission of the company was to "provide executives and decision makers with reliable, easy-to-understand analysis of the ever-increasing and complex state and federal laws." This mission expanded with the popular toolbox talks, OSHA-approved safety talks, that began in the 2000s. Read this article which is a guide to toolbox talk.
How to build a prefabricated steel garage

How to build a prefabricated steel garage

It's not hard to learn how to build a prefabricated steel garage. However, it's not a walk in the park, and beginners might need an assistant to help out with building a metal garage. What makes it easy is that prefabricated sheds or prefabricated garages can be purchased as a DIY kit. It comes with a full frame system and self-drilling screws, sheet metal and trim, door frames, bolts, etc.