By continuing your visit to this site, you accept the use of cookies. They ensure the proper functioning of our services and display relevant ads. Learn more about cookies and act

Not yet registered? Create a OverBlog!

Create my blog

A guide to safety stair nosing

A stair nosing is a "projecting edge, as the part of the tread of a step extending beyond the riser or a projecting part of a buttress." As defined by the Construction Dictionary, a safety stair nosing is, "[a]n abrasive, nonslip stair nosing whose surface is flush with the tread against which it is placed." This article provides you with details about safety stair nosing.

OSHA regulations

Safety stair nosings are regulated by OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and the International Building Code. Safety stair nosings are available at building supply stores or online. Characteristics of safety stair nosings According to OSHA, safety stair nosings must consist of a surface that is non-slip. These nosings are often constructed of aluminum that have a non-slip surface made from granules epoxied to the top. If the stairs are made from concrete, the nosing can end thee inches from either side of the tread. If the stairs are made from steel pans that are filled with concrete, then the stair nosings must extend from side to side. If the stair treads consist of welded bars, then it is acceptable to have stairways without safety stair nosings. However, the edges of the stairs must be clearly marked in some manner, such as reflective or highly colourful tape, to make their presence easily seen. The other qualification with stairways consisting of welded bars is that they must have a serrated or non-slip surface.

International Building Code

According to the International Building Code, the safety stair nosings cannot extend beyond the stair tread more than 1.25 inches. Each of the stair nosings must be the same, ie consisting of the same curvature, including the very top stair of the stairwell. The curvature of the stair tread's leading edge cannot be more than 1/2 inch and the bevelling of the stair nosings cannot be more than 1/2 inch as well. The underside of the nosing's angle must be at least 30 degrees from the vertical. The risers must be solid, or sloped at tan angle not more than 30 degrees from vertical. If the risers are not solid, they must be spaced in such a way to prevent the passage of an object more than four inches between them.

Same category articles Do-it-yourself & Construction

How concrete mixing plants work

How concrete mixing plants work

Have you ever wondered where all that concrete comes from when major construction sites get it 'shipped in'? The likelihood is that the concrete would have been dispatched from special concrete or asphalt mixing plants. In reality, however there is more to this area than you may think. With that in mind, here is a brief guide to how concrete mixing plants work.
How to test and tag electrical equipment

How to test and tag electrical equipment

Portable electrical appliances, such as laptops, toasters or microwaves, can require testing. This ensures that the appliance is in good shape, and can be used without risk of electrocution. You start with a visual check of the appliance for obvious signs of damage. Then, you can use a portable appliance tester to test the internal parts of the equipment.
Compare the prices of floor nailers

Compare the prices of floor nailers

If you are looking for nailers, there are many websites where you can purchase the flooring nailer you are looking for. The thing is, you want to read up on a couple of reviews to make sure you end up with the right tool for the job. Remember, there are many models out there and they all come with their pros and cons. also It is up to you to make sure to find one that will be ideal for you.
Where to get replacement vertical blind slats

Where to get replacement vertical blind slats

When exactly vertical blinds were invented is not certain. Archeologists may have found etchings in an Egyptian tombs which consisted of rushes hung vertically over windows openings. Next came bamboo vertical blinds in China. The designs of vertical blinds have come a long way. Neither are they no longer made with rushes, nor are they the plain, metal slats of the 1950s. However, occasionally you will have to replace vertical blind slats. There is more than one method of doing this.