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All about pharmacology training courses for nurses

Obtaining a nursing degree and license does not entitle a nurse to prescribe medication in most cases. A nurse can treat patients and perform certain medical procedures with the assistance of or under the guidance of a doctor, as well as give doses of drugs prescribed by doctors. A nursing pharmacology course gives nurses additional training and information on drugs and dosing. These courses can be invaluable for nurses. Read on to learn more.

Nursing pharmacology courses

A nursing pharmacology course allows a nurse to get additional training in the field of pharmacology. Usually, these courses are called basic pharmacology or pharmacology for nurses. The training courses may be undertaken as part of studying for a nursing degree (either an associates degree or a bachelor's degree, depending on what is desired). They can also be undertaken separately for additional training and for nurses who want to advance in their careers. When taken separately, they are usually offered to those who are already licensed and registered nurses who have graduated from nursing school and who want to use the information they learn to keep their minds fresh and to keep up with new developments in the field.

Taking classes

Nursing pharmacology courses can be taken in person or online. They may offer certification after you have taken the course or otherwise provide proof of attending and successfully completing the course. When given as part of a nursing school education, passing your nursing pharmacology course is usually a prerequisite to graduating from nursing school. The information taught in the courses does not go as in depth as the information taught to doctors or pharmacists because a nurse usually focuses primarily on administering drugs and not on deciding what drug a patient is to take. It is still important for nurses to understand how pharmacology works and what impact drugs in various forms can have on the bodies of patients. Many hospitals will also look for nurses with pharmacology degrees or training when hiring nurses. So, you may be able to advance more quickly in your career as a nurse if you take the time to attend a training course and to obtain some education in the field.

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