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Five great audition monologues

Choosing an audition monologue can be challenging. There are so many plays and playwrights to choose from that it can be intimidating. Then, there is the issue of genre. Do you want a classical piece? Do you want contemporary or comedic monologues? The options are overwhelming. This article offers five pieces to hep you in your search.

How to choose a monologue

Many actors do not choose a monologue until they are preparing for a specific audition. Read at every opportunity. Experiment with different playwrights and genres as part of improving your skills as an actor. In this way, choosing the right monologue will become an enjoyable experience rather than a dreaded last-minute scramble. It will enable you to find out what suits your style and what makes you shine. At the very least, always have one or two classical and contemporary monologues prepared. This means that you can keep your auditions fresh and that you can be flexible.

The monologues

The Tempest by William Shakespeare: Trinculo Trinculo’s speech when he is looking for shelter in a storm, "Here's neither bush nor shrub", is funny and the descriptions are engaging. it is a good character-driven piece for someone with a keen sense of humour. Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare: Viola In Act II Scene 2, Viola, disguised as a man, realises that Olivia has fallen in love with her. It begins, "I left no ring with her; what means this lady?" This is a great serious-comic piece that allows the actor to show humour, confusion and insecurity and it is addressed directly to the audience. A Loss of Roses by William Inge: Lila In Act II, Scene 2, the out-of-work actress Lila has just made a half-hearted attempt to kill herself after discovering that a boyfriend had not been serious about her. The dialogue is moving and Lila is childlike and naïve. Heart-broken, she talks about her first day at school, her emotions and events that are easy to relate to. Glengarry Glen Ross by David Mamet: Blake Played brilliantly in the film by Alec Baldwin, Blake’s "coffee is for closers" speech is a great piece for a male actor to get his teeth into. Blake is an arrogant, narcissistic salesman sent to improve the performance of a sales team through threats and intimidation. Whose Life is it Anyway? By Brian Clark: Patient (It can be played by male or female actors) The patient is a quadriplegic who is infuriated by the pity that he/she receives. Everybody else seems to know what is best for him/her effectively ignoring his/her wishes. A powerful, emotional piece that, if delivered correctly, will be deeply moving.

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