Not yet registered? Create a OverBlog!

Create my blog

Harvard Business Manager: Review and rate

Harvard Business Review is well known in the business world among managers. The review presents business management case studies, books written by prominent and experienced business people and general topics of interest. The HBR has become a household name among upper management and is often a must-read for those managers of international companies who desire to move upward.

The main highlights of the HBR

The HBR can be considered as a series of articles which contains management case studies and topics. It is designed to pass on experience in the business world to those who are looking for upward mobility. It is designed also for those who may not have a business degree, but who have the talent to lead in the business world. Even though, it is written with some special business terms, the people at HBR insure that those terms are defined or broken down so that the business laymen can understand what is being written. Another advantage of the HBR is its online archive which is available only to subscribers of the premium edition. It contains over 2400 full-text articles within its database. The staff at HBR wants to promote executive education through skill management, providing educational articles that relate to planning, scheduling, setting goals, organising and controlling for the business world.

Review rates

Overseas subscribers have to pay an international rate. The HBR is based upon 11 issues per year, with a combined issue during the summer. The yearly international rate for the basic subscriber in England is US $165 which is approximately £99,95. For the premium subscriber, it is US $ 195 which equals to approximately £118,12 according to the international subscriber rates given out on the HBR website for new subscriptions at Secure.customersvc.com. For subscribers who already have a subscription and who would like to renew it, the website address is as follows: Secure.customersvc.com (wes servlet transactions find account/login) In the basic subscription, one receives access to the online edition, exclusive online content available only to HBR subscribers and timely and convenient access anywhere you go. The added advantage to the premium subscription is the archive. As a premium subscriber, you have at your disposal over 2400 full-text articles. Payment is made with the credit card that you maintain with American Express, Mastercard or Visa.

Same category articles Literature

A review of 'The Last American Man' by Elizabeth Gilbert

A review of 'The Last American Man' by Elizabeth Gilbert

The Last American Man is a book by Elizabeth Gilbert about back-to-nature pioneer Eustace Conway. Elizabeth Gilbert is also famous for her best selling book ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ which has also been made into a movie starring Julia Roberts. Eustace Conway gave up city life and began living in the woods at the age of seventeen.
A review of Beg, Borrow, Steal: A Writer's Life, by Michael Greenberg

A review of Beg, Borrow, Steal: A Writer's Life, by Michael Greenberg

Beg, Borrow, Steal deals with New York journalist Michael Greenberg's moving and humorous account of his attempts to make a living out of writing. Taking its title from one of Ray Lamontagne's songs, Greenberg writes a vivid and lively account of a struggling writer, forced to take a number of humdrum jobs (or "dead end jobs with no skills" as Greenberg describes them), and writing about subjects he knows nothing about in order just to survive.
A review of Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

A review of Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand

Atlas Shrugged is a political novel, which describes Dagny Taggart's attempts to find out who is John Galt. The latter turns out to be an anti-collectivist engineer who has organised a strike of the world's creative people in protest against collectivism. Galt represents all that is best in the individual, but the novel moves quite slowly and has an unrealistic plot. Read on.