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How long does it take to become a pharmacist in the UK?

Being a pharmacist can be a fascinating, challenging, rewarding and ever evolving career. Medicine changes and advances so quickly nowadays that to be a successful pharmacist, it involves constant career and educational development. Therefore, what does it take to become a pharmacist, how long does it take, what are the career prospects and salary? Read this article to know how long it takes to become a pharmacist in the UK.

What does the job involve?

Pharmacist job description A pharmacist has a wide range of responsibilities. Obviously, you need to be completely up-to-date with all medications, their effects and the possible interactions with each other. You need to work with people, understand and implement what the best medication for an individual might be, whether over the counter or otherwise. You are also responsible for the education of pharmacy students when you become more experienced.

Academic qualifications

Becoming a pharmacist in the UK To start on the path to becoming a pharmacist, you need to complete a four-year Masters Degree in Pharmaceuticals (an MPharm). Firstly, you need to find which of the universities carry out recognised accredited pharmacy courses. Subjects Once this is done, you need to be sure that you meet the pharmacy school requirements. You will need at least three A Levels, one of which has to be Chemistry and another, preferably, in Biology or Physics. Your Mathematics and English need to be of high standard too. How long does it take to become a pharmacist Altogether, it takes five years to become a qualified pharmacist. This includes four years' study, and then a year working in a pharmacy of the community, a hospital, clinic care home or other establishment. After that you have worked for this year, learning your trade, you must sit for a nationally recognised exam to qualify as a registered pharmacist.

Job prospects and salary

What happens after you qualify? After that you have qualified as a pharmacist, there are a wide array of places where you can work and, eventually specialise in. These range from community pharmacies to specific hospital wards, that is becoming an oncology pharmacist in a cancer care setting. Altogether with your academic and professional qualification, you must have the right personality to be hired. You need a methodical, steadfast and trustworthy nature as well as to be always be interested in, and have a passion for learning new techniques and medications. Pharmacist salaries An average starting salary, depending on where you work and your level of responsibility, is between £20,000-£30,000. This quickly increases, and after experience and practice, the pharmacist's average salary is anything between £50,000 and over. If you begin to go down the management route, you can earn over £100, 000.

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