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How to make cafe curtains

Are you looking for a nice way to brighten up your cafe? These curtains, placed about halfway down the windows, look great in kitchens and cafes. The best news is that they’re easy to make.

Making the curtain

-Measure the length of the fabric so that its six inches longer than the length between the top and bottom of the window. You should also make the fabric three times wider than the width of your window. -Add two inches to each side of the fabric. The liner you use needs to be the same length as the curtain fabric. -Spread the length of the decorative fabric and the liner in front of you. The front of both fabrics should be facing each other. -Pin the top of both of the fabrics together. -Sew the pinned seams together and turn the fabric so that the best fabric is now on the outside. -To complete the bottom hem, pin the bottom edges of both fabrics together and then, fold the fabrics up. -Fold the new unstitched seam-up. Then, place the stitches close to the fold. -Sew the ends of the folds closed. This will prevent gaping. -Once the bottom seam is sewn, turn the fabric over and fold the left and right sides of the fabric inwards. -Fold again on each side. Sew as close to the edge as possible to create the new edge seams.

Hanging your curtain

To add the rod holding pocket is very easy. It’s very similar to how the bottom curtain hem was created. -Turn your fabric over so that the back of the liner is facing up. -Fold the top of the fabric down. -Fold the fabric down again. -Adjust the amount of fabric you use, depending on the curtain rod you have chosen. If the rod has decorative end caps, the pocket will need to be large enough for the end cap to fit through. -Don’t worry if the end caps are removable, but do remember to take them off, before you run the rod through the pocket. -Stitch as close to the loose edge as possible to make your curtain rod pocket. -Use a double stitch to make sure that the hem will hold. -When you are finished sewing and you are ready to hang the new cafe curtain, remove all of the pins and run the suspension rod through the pocket. -Place your new curtains about half-way down your window. -Remember to iron your curtain, prior to hanging. Hence, enjoy your lovely new window panel curtain. If you are looking for something different for your cafe, consider window net curtains, a voile panel, muslin curtains or some door panel curtains instead.

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