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What are the dangers of syringing your ears?

When there is a buildup of earwax located in the ears, you may need to have earwax removal to remove the earwax buildup. This is sometimes done at your local health centre through a practice nurse who is experienced in using ear syringes to get rid of excess ear wax. However, it is important to understand the dangers associated with syringing your ears.

What are the dangers of syringing your ears?

As the old saying goes, you should never put anything smaller than your elbow in your ear as your ears are very sensitive and poking around can cause serious damage to your eardrum. Damaging your eardrum can have serious consequences on your hearing. Do-it-yourself ear syringing is certainly not recommended because unless you are properly trained, you could end up doing more harm than good. Dangers of syringing your ears Ear irrigation, more commonly known as ear syringing, is widely used to remove excess amount of wax such as black wax which can build up in the ear. However, whether you use an ear irrigator yourself or you get a nurse to remove the earwax, there are certain risks involved. The potential dangers of having your ears syringed include the following: - Ear infections - Perforated ear drum - Tinnitus All three are certainly far from desirable and this is why, ear irrigation is no longer a routine practice.

Removing excess earwax

If you are suffering as a result of excess ear wax, it is important to know a little about how this buildup may be removed. The most useful thing to know is that this potential cause of deafness can usually be quickly resolved. How to remove excess ear wax All that need to start getting rid of a buildup of earwax is some olive oil. You can also use ear wax drops which are available over the counter from healthcare pharmacies or from your local medical centre. Simply put two to three drops of ordinary olive oil down your ear around two to three times a day to soften the ear wax. This can be continued for a period of up to three weeks. If the situation has not improved this time, it is important to get an appointment for a check-up with your family doctor.

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