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What happens in vehicle inspections

During vehicle inspections, the job of the vehicle inspector is to make sure that there are no fuel leaks that could be a danger to the general public. If there are any faults during this brief inspection, they will need to be fixed before the inspection can proceed. If you pass the brief visual inspection, you will then need to present the inspector with your vehicle registration. This article provides a guide to vehicle inspections.

Getting to business

The first thing that will happen is that a licensed inspector will visually inspect your vehicle. After the visual car inspection, you need to make sure that the registration you provide matches the vehicle’s ID number that is found on the side of the dash. Once this is out of the way, you will need to pay the inspector. You will need to wait for the inspector to carry on with his inspections of the emission and safety tests. The testing There are two types of emissions tests: One is OBD (On-Board Diagnostic) for most vehicles and the other is a Snap-Acceleration Opacity. These are for heavy duty vehicles that do not have OBD systems. Testing typically takes around 12 minutes. The inspector will inspect and test 14 areas.

The safety tests

When it comes to the safety tests, the service brake and parking brake are tested. The exhaust system is also tested and checked for black or visible blue smoke. When moving on to the suspension and steering, the inspector will check the steering box and wheel, the front suspension, shocks and the springs. The horn will be tested for an adequate signal and the horn is checked if it is fastened to the wheel. Other tests The tint of the windows, the windows, windshield, washer and wipers are tested. The side mirrors, the rearview mirror and the headlights are inspected. The aim of the light has to be right. The reflectors are tested along with the with the reverse light, registration plate lights and hazards. The safety check includes the tyres, wheels, fenders, bumpers, fuel tank, Unibody or the car’s frame and floor pans. After the inspection, the computer will print an auto sticker that the inspector will place on the windshield and then hand you the test results. This is your vehicle report. The inspector will normally do the honour of driving your car out.

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