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A review of Lazy Town songs

LazyTown is a children's television programme featuring songs, music, live action, puppetry and animation. The central idea of the show is to promote exercise and healthy living through a story that encourages the inhabitants of the Lazy Town to get outside and take exercise rather than stay indoors. This is often explored through songs with titles such as Energy and Bing Bang (Time To Dance). This article provides you with a review of Lazy Town songs.

The show

The main characters in the show are a little girl called Stephanie and her friend Sportacus, the energetic town good guy played by former gymnastics champion and the creator of the show, Magnús Scheving. Between them, they solve minor emergencies and keep the natives of Lazy Town busy and out of the clutches of mean-spirited Robbie Rotten, who spends most of his time trying to get rid of Sportacus and Stephanie to restore laziness throughout the town.

The songs

Upbeat songs The upbeat songs bind the action together and deliver the message in a punchy and colourful manner. They might drive the average adult crazy but these bouncy tunes are perfectly judged for the four-to seven-year-old age group. The show's signature tune Bing Bang (Time To Dance), which reached number four in the UK charts, is essentially an exercise routine for small children, with easy-to-follow dance moves and snappy lyrics such as, 'So we go up up, do the jump, move around and clap your hands together. Three four on the floor, having fun is what it's all about'. Educational purpose of the songs Spooky Song attempts to dispel children's fears about things that go bump in the night, while Cooking By the Book advises of the need to follow instructions when undertaking difficult tasks. Every song has an educational purpose and a catchy hook.

Final word

The fact that it airs in over 100 countries, and has spawned spin-offs including the stage show LazyTown Live and LazyTown DVDs and Cds, is testament to the enduring appeal of this quirky show. The songs are direct and on message - kids get outside and get active - and the lyrics are inspired and educational. The well-rounded characters, simple story lines and the appeal of this colourful show is clear.

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