By continuing your visit to this site, you accept the use of cookies. They ensure the proper functioning of our services, analytics tools and display of relevant ads. Learn more about cookies and control them

Not yet registered? Create a OverBlog!

Create my blog

A review of The Dr Seuss Collection

This collection of twenty hardback books by the best-selling children's author Theodore Seuss Geisel, better known to readers across the world as Dr. Seuss, is a chance to introduce favourite comic tales like "the cat in the hat" to young children, and for older readers to discover new characters such as the charming "Sneetches", whom they might not know. This article reviews The Dr Seuss Collection.

The world of Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss, born in Massachusetts in 1904 and died in California in 1991 at the age of 87, wrote a total of 46 children's books, including "The Grinch who stole Christmas!", "Hop on pop", and "The cat in the hat", which are all included in this collection. This enchanting box set is full of lively, wild, and funny Dr. Seuss's characters that is perfect for developing children's imagination and interest in words. Each book is full of Dr. Seuss's renowned poetic rhythm and humour, along with his bright and silly artwork, and provide hours of fun for both the child and the adult.

Positive points

Educational books Dr. Seuss's stories stay with you throughout your life, and many claim reading Dr. Seuss's books as from an early age which is led to a lifelong love of reading. It's easy to see why in this delightful Dr. Seuss's collection, with timeless tales and poems of funny creatures that have enchanted generations of young (and not so young) readers.
ABC "The cat in the hat" is a joy to read and remains one of the greatest children's books ever written. Dr. Seuss's ABC is a great and fun way for toddlers to learn their alphabets too - a clear reminder why Dr. Seuss is one of America's giants of children's literature.

Negative points

Expensive books This collection makes a great gift, but as a starting place to introduce children to the world of Dr. Seuss, it may be a little expensive and it might be worth buying a few individual titles before you invest in this collection.
Confusing and complicated Dr Seuss's poems are sometimes criticised too for confusing and disrupting children's development by using false words, and the 'silly' style of the poems may not be appealing to every child's taste. Some of the complicated rhymes can certainly be a challenge for small children who are just starting to develop language.

Same category articles Literature

Carnegie library: The facts

Carnegie library: The facts

Carnegie, one of the richest people in the world, is most famous for the many libraries he helped to establish both within and outside the U.S.
Buying guide: New York Times best sellers

Buying guide: New York Times best sellers

This guide to the New York Times' bestselling books list looks at how the list is compiled and how to search for the books from the list you would find interesting. It also discusses along with where to find them both on the internet and on the high street.
Review: Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun

Review: Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun

In Leadership Secrets of Attila the Hun, Wess Roberts dissects Attila's leadership style with historical precision. The book is well-researched and pays great attention to the personal leadership qualities displayed by Attila and his relationships with subordinates.However, it is not always evident that Attila's leadership style has lessons for a different age, where power is exercised differently.
The money tree myth

The money tree myth

The money tree myth is an ancient Chinese legend that a money tree can bring good fortune and prosperity to people. Believed to date back to the Han Dynasty period in Chinese history (roughly 200BCE to 200 CE), there are also pagan traditions of tree worship dating back much further than that. Made of metal, money trees have been discovered in western China in Sichuan Province and neighbouring areas. Interesting folk stories add to their enigma.