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The story of 'The Newark Advertiser'

'The Newark Advertiser' is a weekly British regional newspaper, owned by Advertiser Group Newspapers. It serves the town of Newark-on-Trent in Nottinghamshire and the surrounding areas.

History of 'The Newark Advertiser'

Beginnings The Newark Advertiser was established in 1847 as the 'Newark Monthly Advertiser'. Created by printer William Tomlinson, it had four pages and cost 1d. In 1854, it became a weekly publication and was renamed the 'Newark Advertiser and Farmers' Journal'. Its size doubled to eight pages and the price trebled to 3d. Cornelius Brown
The paper’s first editor was Cornelius Brown. He edited the paper from 1874 until his death in 1907. He was a talented writer who penned seven major books, including a two-volume History of Newark, which took 15 years to write. He was a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. J.C Kew
'The Newark Advertiser Co. Ltd' was incorporated in September 1882 and continued to flourish under Brown’s editorship. When he died, JC Kew took over the reins and 'The Advertiser' settled down to a long and successful period under his editorship which went on through the 1914-18 war and beyond. Cyril Parlby 'The Advertiser''s second editor died as unpredictably as the first and once again the changeover to a successor had to be made without interrupting regular publication. Kew's nephew Cyril Parlby, who had joined the Advertiser staff as a reporter when he came home from the First World War, was the new appointment in 1930. He was destined to remain in the editorial chair longer than either of his predecessors: 37 years. Other editors till present day He was succeeded by his nephew Roger Parlby in 1968. He stepped down in 1984 and Donald Wright took over the role until his retirement in 2000. Harry Whitehouse took over for the next eight years. The current editor, who was appointed in 2008, is Chris Prime.

'The Advertiser' today

'The Advertiser' today The Newark Advertiser currently has a circulation of over 17,000, a readership of nearly 57,000 and is published every Thursday. The paper was given a new look in September 2010 with a redesigned masthead and different fonts to make it easier to read. Publicity As well as news, features and sport, the paper also carries TV and radio listings, a puzzles page, a diary of local entertainments and events, and a "Junior Advertiser" page for kids. Writing for 'Hold The Front Page', a website covering regional journalism, Steve Dyson commented: "Prime clearly instils the importance of quality in his journalists, with every paragraph from intros to captions subject to painstaking care and attention that have become a rare pleasure to see in local newspapers in 2010."

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