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A review of Your Best Life Now by Joel Osteen

Several years ago, people became aware of the existence of a young pastor of a church, which today has a membership of over 70,000 people. The message he preaches rings out loud and clear: "live your best life now". The man who challenges us to do this is Joel Osteen, senior pastor of Lakewood Church in Houston, Texas, USA. This article reviews the themes explored in his book Your Best Life Now.

If you are walking around in an unhappy state of mind, waiting or hoping for situations and circumstances in your life to change, then this will probably never happen if you do not enlarge your vision of who you are. Get rid of a negative mindset Saying good riddance to old mindsets that are filled with negative beliefs which generate negative thinking, is a must according to Joel Osteen. Proverbs 4:23 says "For as he thinks in his heart, so is he." This is one of the fundamental elements of being able to live your best life now.
Forgive, let go and move on Another central theory in Osteen's book is forgiving others and moving forward. This means letting go of old hurts and pains, disappointments and emotional wounds, real or imagined, that you may have incurred. By letting go of these things, you are taking responsibility for your own life, and this leads to adopting a new way of thinking by reprogramming your mind. Faith in God Osteen's book is based on his faith, trust and reliance in God. Each chapter has relevant examples of people, including himself, and their experiences of living the Christian faith. Final word The content of Joel Osteen's book has substance that brings forth life-like experiences because the principles that he extrapolates upon are put into practice in his own life.

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