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A guide to cooking quinoa

Quinoa is a grain that grows 10,000 to 20,000 feet above the level of the sea. It has been grown for 5000 years in the Andes. The grain experienced a revival in 1970. Not only known for its nutritional benefits, quinoa has been famous for its medicinal benefits as well, such as being used for a compress, treating motion and altitude sickness. You can cook quinoa and enjoy this ages-old grain.

Choose the quinoa

Quinoa comes in four varieties: black quinoa, red quinoa, cream quinoa and darker cream quinoa .The cream quinoa is often more readily available in local stores. The black quinoa is more challenging to grow commercially, however, it is often prized. The red quiona has, what some people have described as a "bitter flavour."

Rinse and strain

If you have quinoa which is pre-rinsed, go on to the next step. - Rinse the quinoa before cooking it. - Let it soak in cool water for up to 15 minutes. It can be soaked for longer, but it is not necessary. - Pour the quinona into a metal strainer. - Set the strainer down, so it is suspended across a colander and run cool water over it to rinse the grain. Let the water run for up to three minutes. - Make sure that the strainer you use is very fine to prevent any quinoa from escaping.

Cook

To cook quiona, use this ratio: one part of quinoa to a part and a quarter of water or some other liquid. - Pour the water to a pot and bring it to boil. - Add the quinoa to the water and let the water return to boil. - Cover the pot and lower the heat of the burner to a simmer. Let the quinioa simmer for up to 35 minutes. - Remove the pot from the heat and let it sit covered for up to five minutes more. - Add spices to the quinoa, while it simmers or chaat masala to the water before you add the grains to the pot. - Try cooking the quinoa in broth, such as vegetable, chicken or beef. - Add the cooked quinoa to bean salads, tabbouleh and other dishes. - Spread the cooked quinoa on a cookie sheet and let it become dry and crunchy. - Add it to salads and other recipes.

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