By continuing your visit to this site, you accept the use of cookies. They ensure the proper functioning of our services and display relevant ads. Learn more about cookies and act

Not yet registered? Create a OverBlog!

Create my blog

A guide to writing a character sketch

When writing character sketches, you are introducing your reader to someone. You want your reader to be able to have a strong mental image of the person you are describing, to know the person's characteristics, to understand how they talk and what their value system is. This article looks at how to write a character sketch.

Creating fictional characters

Producing a character sketch, which is an outline of your protagonist, will help when you write a novel or fictional story because you will have a clear idea of what your protagonist looks like and his or her personality. Essentially, a character sketch is a visual picture. In order for your readers to visualise your character, you need to create one. By providing them with a character sketch, your readers will feel as if they are looking at them in an actual picture. A character sketch is where you ask yourself questions about your character that delivers answers for your character sketch. What is a character builder? A character builder is an outline of your character's life. For example, where your character lives, their physical appearance, education, hobbies, interests, personality, and possessions to name a few. When you begin to create a character sketch, you need to take each character trait and ask yourself questions to develop your character. For instance, what job do they have? As you continue with your sketch, you will soon find that your character has become a reality which means that your readers will be able to visualise and believe in them as well. Physical appearance Possibly, the easiest character trait to produce is that of your characters' physical appearance. This describes the characters' physical looks, the length and colour of their hair, what kind of clothes they like, and the colour of their eyes and skin. Personality While appearance is the easiest, personality is the hardest to describe. However, if you think of your character as a real person, then it won't be so hard. Interests One way to effectively help your readers understand your character is by describing their interests which in turn could be interests that your readers have. This creates a bond between them.

Making your characters come alive

In essence, a character sketch is the internal and external foundation of your character. A character sketch example is that of the Catcher in the Rye characters created by J. D. Salinger in 1951. Before he was able to successfully write his fictional story, he had to produce a character sketch that brought his characters alive on the paper. Without the assistance from his sketches, he wouldn't have been able to produce such vivid characters for his readers to enjoy.

Same category articles Literature

A biography of Peter Vardy (Philosophy Lecturer, Author)

A biography of Peter Vardy (Philosophy Lecturer, Author)

Peter Vardy is a British academic, specialising in the subject areas of theology and philosophy, who has published a range of texts dealing with the philosophy of religion. He is currently the Vice Principal of Heythrop College in London. Prior to his academic career, Vardy was a chartered accountant. Read this article to learn more about Peter Vardy.
A review of Popular Hot Rodding

A review of Popular Hot Rodding

Are dragsters and muscle cars your thing? Perhaps you have been thinking about customising that clapped-out old Ford that has been sitting in the garage for years. Or simply, maybe you just enjoy the show. Whatever your motivation, the best way to learn all about this exciting past-time is by picking up one of the many magazines on the subject. One such example is Popular Hot Rodding magazine. This article is going to take a brief look at this publication.
All about: The mystery book club

All about: The mystery book club

The first book club was created by Harry Sherman who began the Little Leather Library in 1961. While this club did not last, the Book-of-the-Month Club, which Sherman helped to found in 1926, did. It was the first of many book clubs that spread around the world. The Mystery Book Club or the Mystery and Thriller Book Club is a UK club for mystery and thriller fans. This article details on The Mystery Book Club.