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A review of Conway Twitty's Hello Darlin'

Hello Darlin' is the signature track of American country musician Conway Twitty. The song is famed the instantly memorable hook, "Hello Darlin', nice to see you." Read on to find out more about the song and artist.

Introduction to Conway Twitty

Born Harold Lloyd Jenkins on 1st September 1933, Conway Twitty was a hugely successful and popular country music singer-songwriter and one who, up until 2006, held a record of 55 number one singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs. Twitty passed away in 1993 but not before leaving a legacy of music in his wake. Twitty began his career playing a blend of pop and rock as well as roll and when heard on the radio was often mistaken for Elvis Presley. However, his true ambition was to record country music and throughout the 60s and 70s, he shot to fame with songs like Lead Me On, Louisiana Man Mississippi Woman and You've Never Been This Way Before. For many years, Twitty resided in Hendersonville, Tennessee which was where he built Twitty City, a country music entertainment park. The park was a popular tourist spot during the 1980s.

About the song

Hello Darlin' is by far one of the most recognisable of all Conway Twitty's songs. Released on Decca Records in March 1970, the song was the artist's fourth number one Billboard Hot Country Single for the year. Hello Darlin' is a classic country ballad about the regret for a lost love. Twitty narrates the story of the unexpected meeting between a man and his old flame and although the man acts proud, he is hurt inside and longs for a second chance. The song is introduced by Twitty speaking rather than singing, the first line, "Hello Darlin', nice to see you."

Final word

Hello Darlin' spent four weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot Country singles chart and finished the year as the most popular country track. In 1993, Hello Darlin' was covered by fellow country musician George Jones on his album High Tech Redneck. Twitty passed away the same year and the album is widely considered to be Jones' tribute to him. Other artists to cover the song have included Lynn Anderson, Daniel O'Donnell and Charley Pride. A final word
In recent years, Conway Twitty's Hello Darlin' has become a regular feature on episodes of the cult American series Family Guy.

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