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A review of Dr Seuss's ABC

Dr. Seuss's ABC is one of those books that becomes a classic simply because everybody who reads it loves it. ABC books are always popular with readers and authors alike. So, of course, an alphabet book by Dr Seuss is bound to be a success. The bonus is that many parents find that Dr Seuss's ABC actually helps their children to learn to spell and to read. Below is a review of the ABC book.

Who Is Dr Seuss?

The correct pronunciation of "Seuss" rhymes with "voice" but most of us pronounce it to rhyme with "juice". Dr Seuss's real name is Theodor Seuss Geisel but not many of his readers seem to care about that. Some people even spell it "suess". Dr Seuss is known for his exotic characters and he introduces us to some wonderful beings in books. His unique use of language also fascinates his readers, but some children might find it a bit confusing.

How Dr Seuss's ABC teaches

The format of the book is simple: the child sees each letter in both upper case and lower case, and is then introduced to an object or a creature whose name begins with the letter. Alphabets Verses like:
"O is very useful.
You use it when you say:
'Oscar's only ostrich
oiled an orange owl today'." will be a little bewildering for some young minds, but others will let the language wash over them to experience Dr Seuss's books. Some of the words might also be unfamiliar to young readers. The book was originally published in 1963 and many parents seem to recommend the original rather than the many printed versions that have been produced over the years. Dr. Seuss's ABC is also available on video, CD ROM, audio books, flashcards and even on a lamp shade. Each of these media has something to recommend, for instance, the flashcards are made from heavy cardboard which allow young children to handle them without destroying them. The interactive versions and videos allow kids to associate the letters of the alphabet with sounds and words. Author's note I'm sure that this book has sparked a love for language in many little kids and I know that it will continue to do so for generations to come. If you have no ambition in this direction for your children, then at least it will give you a break from the tedious "A is for Apple" routine.

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